Posts Tagged 'Sports'

Chicago Trivia Quiz #9—Answers

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1. The last Republican Mayor of Chicago was __________.

(D) William Hale Thompson

2. Who was the last local winner of the NCAA men’s basketball championship?

(B) Loyola University

3. The last Chicago streetcar ran on what line?

(D) Wentworth Avenue

4. The last movie John Dillinger saw was __________.

(B) Manhattan Melodrama

5. The last year Riverview operated was __________.

(C) 1967

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Chicago Trivia Quiz #9

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For the last days of the year, a quiz on Chicago “lasts”—

1. The last Republican Mayor of Chicago was __________.

(A) Benjamin Adamowski

(B) Carter Harrison Jr.

(C) Martin Kennelly

(D) William Hale Thompson

2. Who was the last local winner of the NCAA men’s basketball championship?

(A) De Paul University

(B) Loyola University

(C) Northwestern University

(D) University of Chicago

3. The last Chicago streetcar ran on what line?

(A) Western Avenue

(B) State Street

(C) Clark Street

(D) Wentworth Avenue

4. The last movie John Dillinger saw was __________.

(A) The Public Enemy

(B) Manhattan Melodrama

(C) Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

(D) G-Men

5. The last year Riverview operated was __________.

(A) 1963

(B) 1965

(C) 1967

(D) 1969

ANSWERS POSTED AT 5 PM

 

Chicago Trivia Quiz #8—Answers

1. Skip’s Drive-In (aka Fiesta) was located near __________.

(C) North and First

2. The manager of the 1969 Cubs was __________.

(D) Leo Durocher

3. Garfield Goose thought he was __________.

(A) King of the United States

4. It’s Here was a __________.

(D) coffee house

5. Who was nicknamed “The Cool Gent?”

(C) Herb Kent

Chicago Trivia Quiz #8

A quiz for Chicago Baby-Boomers—

1. Skip’s Drive-In (aka Fiesta) was located near __________.

(A) Grand and Harlem

(B) Roosevelt and First

(C) North and First

(D) Lake and Mannheim

2. The manager of the 1969 Cubs was __________.

(A) Chuck Tanner

(B) Al Lopez

(C) Eddie Stanky

(D) Leo Durocher

3. Garfield Goose thought he was __________.

(A) King of the United States

(B) Mayor of Chicago

(C) Emperor of the North Pole

(D) Donald Duck’s brother

4. It’s Here was a __________.

(A) clothing store

(B) dance hall

(C) theme park

(D) coffee house

5. Who was nicknamed “The Cool Gent?”

(A) Dick Biondi

(B) Dick Gregory

(C) Herb Kent

(D) Hugh Hefner

ANSWERS POSTED AT 5 P.M.

 

 

 

 

 

The Babe Calls His Shot (10-1-1932)

On this date, Babe Ruth hit the most famous—and most controversial—home run in baseball history.  It happened in Chicago, at Wrigley Field.

Ruth’s Yankees were facing the Cubs in the World Series.  The Yankees had won the first two games in New York.  Now the series had moved to Chicago for Game Three.

There was bad blood between the two teams.  The Cubs’ pennant drive had been sparked by the late-season acquisition of shortstop Mark Koenig.  But the rest of the Cubs had voted Koenig only a partial share of World Series money.

Koenig was an ex-Yankee.  The Yankees thought the Cubs were cheating their old teammate.  When the series began, both teams started dissing each other across the field.  “Cheap bastards” was one of the milder terms used.

The score was tied 4-4 when Ruth came to bat in the 4th inning of Game Three.  The Cubs yelled at Ruth.  Ruth yelled back.  He watched the pitcher fog in two quick strikes.

Then Ruth majestically pointed toward the center field bleachers, announcing he’d hit the next pitch there.  The pitcher threw.  Ruth swung.  He hit the ball just where he had pointed.

At least, that’s the legend.

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A few newspaper accounts said that Ruth made some sort of gesture toward the pitcher, or toward the Cubs’ bench.  Most of the reports don’t mention any gesture.  Only one New York paper said that Ruth had pointed—like a man playing pool, the Babe had “called his shot.”

Over the next few years, more and more writers picked up the story of The Called Shot.  At first Ruth brushed aside questions about whether he’d pointed.  By the time he died in 1948, he was happily telling everyone that, of course, he really had pointed.

Later generations of baseball scholars dismissed The Called Shot legend.  Some questioned whether Ruth had even made a gesture.  The whole business seemed like another New York media invention.

Then, in 1992, a fan’s 8-mm movie of Game Three surfaced.  The film shows that Ruth did make a pointing gesture with his hand.  But it’s not clear who or what he was pointing at.  So the debate continues.

By the way, in case you haven’t guessed, the Yankees swept the Cubs in the 1932 World Series in four straight games.

—30—

The Cubs’ Second-Greatest Moment (9-28-1938)

The greatest moment in the Chicago Cubs’ long history is winning the 2016 World Series after a 108-year drought. Almost everyone will agree on that.  The team’s second-greatest moment happened eighty years ago today.

Back in the Depression era, the Cubs were always contenders. They won National League pennants every three years—1929, 1932, 1935.  So in 1938 they were due to win again.

Gabby Hartnett and admirers

That year, the Pittsburgh Pirates jumped out to an early lead in the pennant race. So in July, Cubs owner Phil Wrigley fired manager Charlie Grimm.  Replacing Grimm was star catcher Charles Leo “Gabby” Hartnett.  By now Hartnett was over the hill, and played only part-time.

The Cubs began to play better ball. Pittsburgh began to falter.  On September 27 the Pirates arrived at Wrigley for a three-game series with their lead down to one-and-a-half games.  That afternoon the Cubs eked out a 2-1 victory.  Now the Pirates led by only a half-game.

The next day the two teams faced off again. And again it was a tight game.  The Cubs trailed twice, 3-1 in the sixth, 5-3 in the eighth.  Each time they fought back.  Going into the ninth the game was tied 5-5.

Weekday baseball games usually started around 3 p.m. eighty years ago, to better attract customers who might want to cut out of work early. By the ninth inning it was getting dark.  With no lights at Wrigley, the umpires decided this would be the last inning.  If the game remained tied, it would be made up as part of a double-header the next day.

The Pirates went out one-two-three. The Cubs went out one-two.  That brought up Catcher-Manager Hartnett.

Strike one! Strike two!  Then another pitch, and Hartnett connected.  The ball arched slowly toward the left-field wall.  In the gathering darkness, it was hard to follow.  Would it make it all the way?  It just did.  Cubs 6, Pirates 5.

Today we’d call this a walk-off home run. Hartnett didn’t have a chance to walk.  Fans started pouring onto the field and Hartnett started running.  By the time he reached home plate, he had an escort of hundreds of smiling, shouting, back-slapping partisans.

Hartnett’s shot in the dark became known as “The Homer in the Gloamin’.” The Cubs were now in first place.  The next afternoon they completed their sweep of the Pirates 10-1, and went on to win the pennant.

Of course, in the World Series, the Yankees trounced the Cubs in four straight. But then, this is only the second-greatest moment in Cubs’ history.

—30—

 

Chicago Trivia Quiz #3—Answers

1985 Chicago Bears—Super Bowl XX champions

1. Bronko Nagurski’s real first name was __________.

(B) Bronislau

2. How many touchdowns did Walter Payton score in Super Bowl XX?

(A) none

3. Whom did the Chicago Cardinals trade in return for nine Rams players?

(D) Ollie Matson, in 1959

4. When the Bears decided to leave Wrigley, what was their first choice for a new home?

(D) Dyche Stadium, aka Ryan Field

5. What NFL record did George Halas (as a player) hold for nearly 50 years?

(D) longest run with a fumble, 98 yards on 11-4-1923 (Halas said he ran so far so fast because Jim Thorpe was chasing him.)